Illustrated Edition - Page 6.


August 16, 1894

MARION'S ENTERPRISING BUSINESS MEN.

————————

H. K. WOODS.

In every city there is at least one firm conspicuous in its line, which by reason of its fine reputation, the superior quality of its goods, and the high social and business standing of its proprietor overshadows others. In Marion such a position is occupied by H. K. Woods, whose headquarters are handsomely and conveniently fitted up with all the appliances necessary to carry on his large and flourishing trade. Mr. Woods was raised in this county, has had twelve years experience in the drug business; until the last year he was a member of the firm of Hillyard & Woods, but has now bought the entire stock. With such an honorable business man at the head, the house is sure to succeed. He is an accurate, scientific and conscientious druggist and chemist, who is building up a large trade, a solid business and a well merited popularity. The profession of a druggist is one above all others requiring strict and careful preparation, an accurate knowledge of all the many and varied poisonous and non-poisonous preparations used in pharmacopia, and a power of concentrating the mind on the business in hand to the exclusion of every thing of minor importance. These are the requirements of a good druggist, and of these Marion has her full share. Among these we will, with general consent, place H. K. Woods in the lead, for he has won an enviable position in the business fraternity. He carries a very large and complete stock of drugs, drug sundries, patent medicines, perfumes, books, stationery paints, oils, and not the least comprehensive is the large stock of wall paper. The stock is replete with all articles that naturally come in this line, and these selected with the utmost care, as Mr. Woods studies the wants of the people and does well his part in supplying all that can be kept by any first-class drug house. He makes special sales to the physicians in tributary towns, selling them their drugs for their dispensation, and also does a limited wholesale business, but this branch is on the increase. The whole stock is bought as low as experience and ready money can buy goods and will be sold as low as possible. Both stories of the building, 20x90 in size, are filled with goods, the lower being the display and salesroom while the upper is filled with heavy and bulk goods. The main store room is beautifully furnished with cherry wood furniture, cabinets and prescription cases and thus his store room is one of the finest in the city, and his stock meets every demand of the trade. Every prescription placed on his prescription case will be compounded promptly any hour of the day or night by a man whose ability is unquestioned, and from a stock of drugs that bears the closest inspection. This house is one of the leading contributors to the commercial progress of the city, and its large and increasing business constitutes a prominent feature of the general trade.

————————

R. F. HAYNES, JR.

The importance of business houses of this character can not be overestimated, and a work of this description, setting forth the great commercial interests of the city would be far from perfect did we fail to make mention of this well established retail house.

Mr. Haynes is a young man, having only just passed his thirty-third milestone, but in business experience he is old, and he is one of Marion's most highly respected citizens, who believes in doing his part toward the upbuilding of the city. He was engaged in the drug business three years at Caseyville, but returned to his native county and began the dry goods business at Marion. He is too well known to admit of an introduction, and his business has grown from its very beginning. The store room is 20x90, well arranged throughout, and divided into its necessary departments for a complete stock of dry goods, dress goods, notions, hats, caps, ladies and gents furnishing goods, trunks, valisces [valises], boots and shoes, not wanting in any particular, for it is his intention to keep just what is wanted by his customers, and deems nothing too good for their trade; and patrons realize the fact, knowing they always have a good assortment to select from, and get goods as cheap as they can be obtained anywhere. Mr. Haynes is possessed of fine business qualifications and his manner of doing business has won him many friends. He carries an $8,000 stock of goods, which was bought at prices far below what such goods usually bring, at the same time buying fashionable and seasonable goods. He now offers the entire stock on the same basis he bought them, so his goods are necessarily sold cheap and cash customers will be greatly surprised at the bargains now offered at the house of R. F. Haynes. These prices are in no one department but extend through the entire stock and assures us that now is the time to buy summer goods. The business is carried on in systematic order, which to be fully appreciated must be seen in the full tide of business. Nothing helps a town so much as for each of its business men to determine to make his business one of great value to the purchaser, a credit to the town, and an honor to its builder, and in this the business of Mr. Haynes is a decided success, and he has made himself a representative business man, one the Marion is pleased to number among her citizens. His efforts are always directed with studied certainty, and his close attention to business enables him to compete successfully with similar establishments. In buying he exercises good judgment, selecting only such as afford him ready sales, hence a small margin gives a fair profit, and his interest is to secure a large trade. The magnitude of his operations places him in the van, and he will proceed with the march of the progressive.

————————

J. N. THOMAS.

THOMAS BROS.

Among the industries most essential to the well-being of the people of a city none are more important than those which furnish the daily supplies of provisions. In this connection we would call attention to the firm of Thomas Bros., which is worthy of an extended notice, as they are the acknowledged leaders of the grocery trade, not from any claims made by them, not from any desire to make individual comparisons, but from their extended transactions, high standing, and splendid reputation in this place accorded them. This house has from the outset taken a conspicuous position for energy and industrious application, for rapid and solid success in business. One year ago they came to this city from Clarksville, Tennessee, bought out the bakery and confectionery of B. F. McMican at Mr. J. N. Woods' old stand, and have since built up a trade that does them credit. They are running the bakery and have employed an expert in the culinary art, so all bread is fresh, wholesome and properly made. To the confectionery they added complete lines of family groceries, glassware, queensware, tobacco and cigars. Go to this store, and if a rare display of quality, quantity and variety can please, it is shown to perfection. Coffee, teas, sugar, pepper, spices and all the condiments that make up variety, while ample room is devoted to soap, candles, cheese, jellies, canned goods, crackers and the thousand and one articles incident to a first class stock of groceries. All kinds of provisions and flour are also kept, new and fresh, calculated to please the most experienced taste. Their large sales forbid anything being on hands long, so they can honestly insure the stock as fresh at all times. In season you will find fresh fruit and vegetables, so that the house of Thomas Bros. is a veritable supply room, and these are the best of goods that are placed on the market. They own property in the city and have come to stay. They take special delight in keeping up with the times, and their goods give entire satisfaction in every respect.

————————

H. F. RAY.

The most ingenious mechanic of Marion is he whose name heads this sketch. His father before him was a mechanic and millwright, and at the age of fifteen, H. F. Ray began working with him and has, excepting the time he was in school, been engaged in mechanical persuits [pursuits] continually every since. Mr. Ray was born in Bedford Tennessee in 1858 and spent his early life on a farm. He moved to Marion in 1887 and opened up a general machine repair shop, sells all kinds of pumps and does a general plumbing and gass [gas] fitting business. Last August while putting up a smoke-stack at the mill of A. Dewey & Co., he conceived the idea of a smoke condenser that would make a smoke stack a useless attachment. He had considerable trouble in getting the smoke stack raised and properly attached, but on that trouble hinges his great invention and it will be an ultimate success for it can be manufactured and sold cheaper than smoke stacks, which will insure its universal adoption. The machine is so simple in design and construction that it seems impossible that it should do such a wonderful thing for it makes cleanliness so far as smoke is concerned possible to large cities, the homes of large manufacturing enterprises and will at once be accepted as a sanitary convenience and ere long be considered a real necessity. It has many advantages over all other kinds of smoke condensers as it takes up no room, makes a fine draft and does not wear out or get out of order. The design is complete, patented and Mr. Ray and his associate Mr. A. Dewey, of the firm of A. Dewey & Co. are ready to put them on the market. If some one would open a manufactory there is no reason why he cannot make a fortune for himself and at the same time give the patentees a royalty that will amount to a goodly income for inventive genius should have its reward, but a capitalist who will interest himself in it for his own gain, will find that he has made a splendid investment. Messrs. Ray and Dewey are seeking capital to place this wonderful invention on the market, to be made in sizes suited for various purposes as it can be used wherever there is smoke to be consumed even attached to steamboats.

Mr. Ray has ever shown an interest in his own town and county and is thoroughly public spirited and progressive. He is now police judge of Marion and a good [illegible] belongs to the Mason [illegible] and Workman orders, and is an active worker in the Methodist church and Sunday schools.

————————

W. M. FREEMAN, THE JEWELER.

Success is inevitable to those who put forth energy, intelligence and integrity in the business which they have adopted, and there is no business surer of ultimate success when followed with ability and fidelity to the interests and wants of its patrons, than the jewelry business. Artistic jewelry is so essential a part of the requirements of polite society, is so necessary to the proper advancement of its beauty, that the former estimation with which it was regarded as a relic of barbaric taste is exploded and no longer prevalent. Every city like Marion boasts of one or more of these attractive establishments, and that of W. M. Freeman whose reputation is co-extensive with the fame of the county from the magnitude of the business and the influence in the trade, deserves more space than we generally bestow on similar establishments. By great business sagacity and honerable [honorable] dealings this house has acquired a position among its contemporaries as one of the leading jewelry houses of this entire section. His stock, which is varied and comprehensive, includes clocks and watches from the most celebrated makers, native and foreign. He claims special expertness in repairing watches and jewelry, and in engraving which claim, from general opinion, he has sustained. Mr. Freeman is in every respect among the most prominent and enterprising citizens of Marion. He takes a marked interest in all that has for its end the advancement of the material interest of the city, in many respects standing in the front rank, not only in business, but socially. He is a deservedly popular gentleman of valued experience, and his business is one of the truly creditable ones of the city. A call at his store will convince any one of the beauty of the goods and the artistic arrangement, and the prospective buyer becomes a ready purchaser.

————————

POSTMASTER A. M. HEARIN.

The Marion post office is one of the best arranged postal concerns in the State. It is situated near the business center of the city and is fitted up neatly and conveniently, admitting of perfect system in the handling of the mails, so delay in sending or receiving letters, papers, or even fourth class mail, is a trouble that our good people know nothing of. Postmaster A. M. Hearin was born at Madisonville, Ky., in 1844. He is a time tried Democrat of the first water, received his appointment July 17, 1893, and has made a careful and accommodating official. The position is no small undertaking, and when a man has filled the place to the entire satisfaction of all, party not considered, one knows that his duty has been promptly performed, for if there is any place that is always surrounded with strife in a town or city, that position is the post office. It seems to be an inherited discord at most places, but Marion can congratulate herself on its absence. Mr. Hearin has resided in the city for the past seven years. Previous to that time he was employed as weighmaster at St. Bernard's coal mines. On his arrival here he opened up a confectionery establishment which he conducted successfully until he receive his official appointment. He now carries a nice line of books and stationery in connection with his post office work, as the two seem wholly congenial, and all books and papers are sold very cheap. His son, Thomas E. Hearin, is the courteous deputy of the chief and since they have been connected with our postal service they have given splendid satisfaction to the patrons of the office. Postmaster Hearin served three years as police judge of the town, and is thoroughly identified with Marion and her institutions. One rarely meets with a more congenial soul, and earnest devotee to duty.

————————

A. DEWEY,

Was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in 1845; when only sixteen years of age, he began working in a mill, so he is a man of long and studied experience, one that has ever applied himself closely to his work. In 1867 he first came to Kentucky taking charge of the Big Springs Mills at Princeton, where he held the position as head miller for nine years with good satisfaction to his employer and in a manner that stamped him as a first-rate miller. Failing health led him to resign this place to accept the head position in the Great Western Mills, north of the Ohio. After remaining there a number of years he came back to Princeton, Ky., and bought an interest in the Fredonia Valley Mills, which property he disposed of four years ago and identified himself with the interest of Marion by becoming a member of the firm A. Dewey & Co., the proprietors and managers of the Marion Rolling Mills. Mr. Dewey is a splendid mill-man and much of the success of this plant is due to his experience, good judgment and executive ability, upright in all his dealings he will continue on the same plan of honorable, straight-forward policy that has marked the business since its inauguration.

————————

————————

————————

————————

————————

————————

————————

————————

Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, August 16, 1894, Image 6 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.

[My comments are in brackets.]


<Prev> - <Next>