Illustrated Issue - Page 6.


July 10, 1902.

MINING SCENES.

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BONANZA MINE.

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ELECTRIC LIGHT.

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The City Brilliantly Lighted by Electricity.

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The Marion Electric Light and Ice company, a corporation composed entirely of our own citizens, installed some months since a plant that is about as near perfect as is possible with our present knowledge of electricity.

Housed in a neat brick building, close to its coal and water supply, the huge engine and dynamos have scarce given an hour's trouble since their duties began.

With heavy protected copper wires, strung on great strong cedar poles deeply set in the ground, the insulation is as perfect as scientific skill can make it.

The arc lights throughout the various streets are the latest brought out, and certainly the most brilliant of any street light known. the business houses and residences are all users of this pure white light, the very low price being a strong incentive to its universal adoption. The private or residence circuit is "on" all night, and whenever the afternoon or morning is dark or cloudy this circuit is always on tap.

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HEALTH CONDITIONS.

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The County Health Officer Says, "Very Little Sickness."

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In writing of the health conditions of Marion and vicinity it is scarcely necessary to mention the climatic conditions. The climate is the same as is found in all parts of the lower Ohio valley. We have very little malaria, diptheria [diphtheria] and scarlet fever are almost unknown, and when these diseases do appear they are mild in type and easily controlled, seldom proving fatal. Rheumatism is not very common and scarcely ever of a severe character. The most common ailments are derangement of the stomach and bowels, which are often caused by the reckless manner in which some people devour the many good things they have on their tables.

The medical and legal professions, the clergy, the county, city, school and health officers and the business men and teachers, in fact, almost the entire population, are thoroughly cognizant of the fact that Marion is rapidly assuming city proportions, and therefore sanitation, proper hygienic conditions, are of prime importance.

They are working in harmony to that end. Everybody is ready to give aid and sympathy to the health officers in their efforts to stamp out and prevent the spread of disease. Invalids who are looking for medicinal waters need go no further. The various springs in Crittenden county supply waters suited to all diseases for which natural mineral waters are prescribed. Hundreds of People flock to them every year, and they continue to grow in favor. Only one (Crittenden springs) has been provided with hotel and other accommodations, but there are others which, in time, will be improved and made accessible. Crittenden county is destined to become one of the most noted health resorts in the Mississippi valley.

W. J. J. PARIS,

County Health Officer.

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Dr. W. J. J. Paris.

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Fire Clay.

At Smithland, near the Cumberland river, is an extremely large deposit of fire clay. It is being mined and shipped by the Kewanee Fire Clay company to their works at the town of that name.

The clay is raised and transported to the barges lying on the Cumberland river at comparatively small expense; it is then towed to Joppa on the Chicago and Eastern Illinois railroad, and loaded on cars. The clay is of fine texture for the production of fire brick. An Illinois company is largely interested in this enterprise.

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Prospectors will find a good hotel at the Utley House, Salem.

Mr. Prince Mitchell at Lola has a large private house where visitors are taken good care of.

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Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, July 10, 1902, Image 7 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.

[My comments are in brackets.]


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