ROBERTS Gleanings from The Press - 1904-1905


  • January 14, 1904

     

    REPTON.

     

    Dr. H. D. Roberts has been on sick list several days.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, January 14, 1904, Image 10 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • January 28, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Thomas Roberts and his little son, George, was here last week.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, January 28, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • February 25, 1904

     

    REPTON.

     

    John E. Roberts, of Mattoon, left here Monday evening for Anniston, Mo; he has a position with the Cotton Belt railroad.  We regret very much to give him up.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, February 25, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • February 25, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    John Roberts and Charley Merritt left here Monday for Clay county, Ark.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, February 25, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 3, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Dr. H. D. Roberts will move to Marion.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, March 3, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 17, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Jim Sullivan and Owen Roberts were at Repton Saturday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, March 17, 1904, Image 2 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 24, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Frank Roberts, of the Blackburn neighborhood, was here last week.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, March 24, 1904, Image 3 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 24, 1904

     

    I WOULD SEE JESUS THERE[THEN].

     

    "Sir, we would see Jesus"--St. John, 12:21.

     

    Oft when among earth's busy throng,

    The lowly mingle with the proud,

    With yearning heart and restless eyes

    I scan the eager, hurrying crowd

    I see the beauty, wealth and pride

    The glittering, grand display of men,

    I turn away unsatisfied;

    I would see Jesus then.

     

    In sorrow's hour, my heart bowed down

    With woe so great no words I speak

    No earthly friend can sympathize

    No earthly friend can comprehend,

    Yet in my time of deepest grief

    All else unheeded and unseen,

    My soul would find a sweet relief

    Could I see Jesus then.

     

    When by affliction's hand laid low

    I rest upon a dying bed,

    My race is run, I know that I

    Shall soon be numbered with the dead,

    How vain the help of earthly friends,

    How vain to turn to earth again

    No, when these eyes grow dim in death,

    May I see Jesus then.

     

    Now all these earthly woes are past,

    Grief, pain and death I fear no more,

    The heights of love are gained at last

    I stand entranced at heaven's door,

    In realms of bliss so pure, so bright,

    Surpassing words of tongue or pen,

    With new, glad eyes, oh glorious sight,

    I shall see Jesus then.

     

    --Mrs. Ida M. Roberts.

    Mattoon, Ky. Oct. 19, 1903.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, March 24, 1904, Image 6- Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • June 2, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Elza Travis of Marion and Owen and Lewin Roberts of this place attended Sundy [sic] school at Moore's Sunday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, June 2, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 15, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    J. N. Roberts and daughter spent Saturday night in the Sugar Grove neighborhood.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 15, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 15, 1904

     

    RODNEY.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts, of Mattoon, has accepted the call from the people of Sugar Grove and will teach the school at that place. That vicinity being Miss Vienna's old home, it is quite a compliment to the young lady to begin her career there as a preceptress.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 15, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 22, 1904

     

    RODNEY.

     

    John E. Roberts, formerly of Mattoon, but now of Clay county, Arkansas, has, we are glad to note, recently secured a nice position with a well known business establishment there.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 22, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 28, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Harry Perkins, of Tribune, was the guest of Owen Roberts Saturday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, July 28, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 29, 1904

     

    LOCAL BREVITIES.

     

    J. M. [N.] Roberts and daughter, Miss Viana [Vienna], were pleasant callers Monday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 29, 1904, Image 5 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 29, 1904

     

    RODNEY.

     

    Mrs. Ida M. Roberts, of Mattoon, is here.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 29, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 29, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts is attending the Teachers' Institute in Marion.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 29, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • August 18, 1904

     

    [MATTOON.]

     

    We would be glad to hear from you John Elmer Roberts.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, August 18, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • September 30, 1904

     

    BLACKBURN.

     

    Mrs. Rena Roberts got her hand hurt very bad last week in a sorghum mill.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, September 30, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • October 20, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Wm. Golliday, of Rosebud, will move to Missouri next week and leave his family in charge of J. N. Roberts.

    . . .

    Mrs. J. N. Roberts has purchased a Singer sewing machine.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, October 20, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • October 21, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts, who is teaching at Sugar Grove, visited parents here Sunday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, October 21, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • October 28, 1904

     

    MATTOON.

     

    Mrs. J. N. Roberts and son visited relatives near Iron Hill last Sunday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, October 28, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • November 10, 1904

     

    HOODS CREEK.

     

    J. N. Roberts has moved to W. S. Golladay's farm.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, November 10, 1904, Image 4 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • November 25, 1904

     

    ROSE BUD.

     

    Owen Roberts visited his friend, Harry Perkins, of Tribune, recently.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, November 25, 1904, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • January 5, 1905

     

    LETTER FROM MISSOURI.

     

    QULIN, Mo., Dec 30.--Hello, Mr. Jenkins, and the many readers of the dear old Press.

     

    I hope you are all o. k. and had a merry Christmas.

     

    I thought some time ago that I could be there to share my part of the holidays with my many friends but I could not go so I am wishing you all the pleasure and happiness you could wish.

     

    The 17th of next month I will be twenty-one years of age. I would like to receive letters from my young friends, and will try to answer all I get.

     

    Mr. Jenkins I understand you are sending each one of your correspondents your photograph. I furnished the Press news about as long as any one person, so don't slight me because I have quit and am out here in this garden spot of the world.

     

    Again wishing you all a happy new year, I remain,

     

    Very sincerely,

    Jno. E. Roberts.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, January 5, 1905, Image 7 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • February 16, 1905

     

    REPTON.

     

    John E. Roberts of Mattoon was in our town Saturday; he informs us that he will leave for the west in a few days.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, February 16, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • February 16, 1905

     

    ROSE BUD.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts will enter school at Marion in a few days.

    . . .

    John E. Roberts visited friends and relatives near Sugar Grove last week.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, February 16, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • February 16, 1905

     

    IRON HILL.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts closed her school in the Sugar Grove district Thursday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, February 16, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • February 17, 1905

     

    ROSE BUD.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts closed a successful school at Sugar Grove Thursday. She will spend two week's vacation with her parents here before entering Marion school.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, February 17, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 2, 1905

     

    ROSEBUD.

     

    John E. Roberts returned to Arkansas several days ago.

    . . .

    Miss Verna [Vienna] Roberts entered the Marion school Monday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, March 2, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 3, 1905

     

    Interesting Letter.

     

    Gladstone, Ky., Feb. 14, 1905--EDITOR CRITTENDEN RECORD:--I find while visiting my old home and surrounding parts that many are making preparations to try their fortunes in different parts of the West.

     

    Now, if you will give me space I will tell them a few things about the great country of Arkansas, of which I have visited many parts and probably what little I can tell of it will be of benefit to some one.

     

    Arkansas is an empire in extent in which are, as yet, thousands of acres of cheap land that will respond to every effort.

     

    The climate is all that could be desired. The average altitude being 2,000 feet above the sea makes it a country of extreme healthfulness. It is above the zone of yellow fever and malaria is only known in the lower, swampy areas.

     

    It is destined to become the home of a healthy, hardy race of people, and that which is true of the human race applies equally well to the health of all domestic animals.

     

    There are springs of pure, clear water and living streams which abound with all kinds of fish for those who first occupy the beautiful land where flowers bloom perennially and the grass lives through the entire year.

     

    Is this the kind of home you seek? If you do, there is danger in delay. This beautiful land is awaiting occupation today, but will not be vacant many years. Aside from the adaptability of these lands for agricultural purposes, there is a mild climate throughout the entire year where farmers are not, from necessity, compelled to expend the whole earnings of the summer to provide for the necessities of the winter.

     

    The history of pioneer farmers who settled and developed the great country west of the Mississippi river in acquiring lands at two or three dollars per acre, and having them enhanced ten and twenty fold within a few years, thus creating wealth while enjoying the comforts of a life of industry, will be repeated in this new field, and with quicker results than have ever been realized in the past.

     

    The person who seeks a home in Arkansas and expects to find it a paradise without offort [effort] on his part, will be disappointed there as elsewhere. Neither should the man who has nothing but his energy and muscle to depend upon, expect to realize the full extent of his hopes. To him that hath shall be given, is as true today as it was nineteen hundred years ago, even though his possessions be limited in extent.

     

    It is essential to the fullest measure of success in this as in any new country, that a man has at least, supplies to carry him through one season while he is learning to adopt his previous farming experience to the different requiremnts [requirements] of that climate. He should have good teams, a few cows and sufficient means to acquire his land and build his home. No matter how humble for the man whose condition is such, there is no reason for a moment's hesitation.

     

    Stock farming--which means some attention to stock in connection with crops, is the true method of agriculture in Arkansas.

     

    The man who has the good judgment to agree with this idea, and the intelligence to understand the condition of the climate and resources of the soil can find no fairer field in the entire universe where man will in a very few years have an independent income, increasing herds and flocks, waving fields of golden grain, bursting granaries, blooming orchards, convenient markets that can never be outstocked and a home of happiness and contentment which he has had the satisfaction of arranging for himself.

     

    Where there are a number of families in a neighborhood who desire to emigrate to a new country they should organize into a colony and settle together. By this method they take with them an acquaintanceship and will thus be enabled to hold together and carry their peculiar views in regard to church and school management.

     

    In a financial way, colony organization can procure concessions and inducements from owners of town sites or large tracts of land, who will often make large donations for special purposes to secure their location, and thus assist in a more rapid development of the adjoining country. This is even more important to the colonists themselves as it gives them a settled community at once where otherwise it would require years.

     

    It is not necessary to bring your household goods, as furniture can be obtained there at about the same price with the freight added. The same is true of farming tools. However, where several families are moving together and they cannot dispose of these things without loss it might be well to charter a car and ship their goods together.

     

    Of course, you want to know about the game. The buffalo, once abundant in the western part, are now things of the past. The deer and antelope that leap the forest are the largest and best game. Fire-hunting, still-hunting and driving with hound and horn are the three modes of securing them. Wild turkeys afford a favorite sport to the early riser in the gobbling season of the spring. Geese and ducks are yet plentiful on the rivers and creeks. Rabbits of different kinds, coons, squirrels, opossums, foxes, wolves, wildcats and panthers are found in all sections.

     

    If any further information is desired about Arkansas, write to me with enclosed stamp at Pollard, Ark., and I will gladly tell you all I know.

     

    Saying good bye to you and my old home, I am

     

    Yours very respectfully,

    JOHN E. ROBERTS.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, March 3, 1905, Image 7 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 10, 1905

     

    ROSE BUD.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts is attending school at Marion.

    . . .

    J. N. Roberts has two silver pieces which he has had in his possession forty years.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, March 10, 1905, Image 4 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 17, 1905

     

    LOCAL BREVITIES.

     

    Miss Viana [Vienna] Roberts, one of the normal students visited her parents at Gladstone Saturday and Sunday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, March 17, 1905, Image 5 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • March 24, 1905

     

    LOCAL BREVITIES.

     

    Mrs. Harve Roberts, of Repton, was here Monday.

    . . .

    Jno. N. Roberts, of Gladstone, a soldier in the Civil War, has had in his possession a loaded cannon cap he took from the arsenal in the old fort at Smithland when he was on duty there with the other boys of blue.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, March 24, 1905, Image 5 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • May 5, 1905

     

    Appreciates The Record.

     

    Piggot[t], Ark., April 21, 1905.

     

    Mr. Jas. E. Chittenden,

    Marion, Ky.

     

    My Dear Friend:--Will write you a few lines to let you know I am proud to see the dear old Record resurrected from the ashes and booming again after the great fiery disaster which befell it a few weeks since. I hope the Republicans and patrons of the Record will continue to uphold it as their banner and do all in their power to aid you in the good work which so far you have carried out with a degree of success that has attended the efforts of no other man who has ever attempted it.

     

    The primary went just to suit me. Hurrah for Blackburn! I hope he, together with all the others, will be victorious at the polls this fall.

     

    Well, hoping this will find you enjoying all the health and happiness you could wish. I am, as ever, a friend and well wisher to your paper.

     

    JOHN E. ROBERTS.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, May 5, 1905, Image 3 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • June 16, 1905

     

    Rose Bud.

     

    J. N. Roberts made a flying trip to Shawneetown Wednesday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, June 16, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • June 30, 1905

     

    Rodney.

     

    John E. Roberts, of Piggott, Ark., will visit his old home near here on the 4th of July.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, June 30, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 6, 1905

     

    Married in Arkansas.

     

    John E. Roberts, an old Crittenden county boy, was married on June 26th to Miss Ernestine McLesky, of near Piggott, Ark. The marriage is the culmination of a very pretty romance. Miss McLesky was the first young lady with whom Mr. Roberts became acquainted when he located in that vicinity, some 17 months ago and it proved to be a case of love at first sight. The groom is a son of J. N. Roberts, a leading citizen of Rose Bud, while the bride is a daughter of one of the best farmers of Clay county, Ark.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, July 6, 1905, Image 1 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 7, 1905

     

    LITTLE RECORDS.

     

    J. N. Roberts, of Rose Bud, attended court here today.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 7, 1905, Image 5 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 7, 1905

     

    Rose Bud.

     

    John E. Roberts and Miss Ernest McLeskey were married at Piggott, Ark., June 26. The groom is a former Crittenden county boy, who left here last year to seek a home in the west. He is a young man of honor, who her [has] proven himself to be capable, and worthy of trust and confidence. The bride is the pretty daughter of Robert McLeskey, a well-to-do farmer of Clay county, Ark.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 7, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 14, 1905

     

    Rodney.

     

    John E. Roberts, whose marriage was reported last week, has located at Qulin, Mo., where he has charge of a restaurant.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 14, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • July 21, 1905

     

    Rose Bud.

     

    Miss Vienna Roberts will teach the Applegate school.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, July 21, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • August 24, 1905

     

    RODNEY.

     

    Miss Elva Roberts, who is teaching our school, visited her parents at Rosebud Sunday.

    . . .

    J. N. Roberts of Rose Bud, was here Monday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, August 24, 1905, Image 5 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • September 1, 1905

     

    Rosebud.

     

    Mr. and Mrs. John E. Roberts, of this place, visited Mrs. Elizabeth Burton, of Mattoon, Sunday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, September 1, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • October 26, 1905

     

    REPTON.

     

    Dr. H. D. Roberts was in Blackford Monday afternoon on business.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, October 26, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • October 26, 1905

     

    RODNEY.

     

    Miss Elva Roberts visited in Rosebud Saturday and Sunday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, October 26, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • November 3, 1905

     

    Rodney.

     

    J. N. Roberts, of Rosebud, was here Friday.

    . . .

    Miss Elva Roberts visited at Rosebud Saturday.

    . . .

    Mrs. Ida M. Roberts, of Rosebud, visited Mrs. Chas. M. Clift Friday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Record. (Marion, Ky.) 1904-1907, November 3, 1905, Image 9 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • November 23, 1905

     

    RODNEY.

     

    J. N. Roberts, of Rose Bud, was in our midst Friday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, November 23, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


  • November 30, 1905

     

    RODNEY.

     

    J. N. Roberts, of Rose Bud, was here Monday.

     

    Source:  Crittenden Press. (Marion, Ky.) 1879-1907, November 30, 1905, Image 8 - Chronicling America - The Library of Congress.


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